Posts for: June, 2019

YouMayNotNeedaNarcotictoManagePost-DentalWorkPain

There's no doubt treating dental problems can improve your health. But because the mouth is among the most sensitive areas of the body, many dental procedures can be potentially uncomfortable after treatment.

We rely on pain medication to alleviate any dental work discomfort, especially during recuperation. Our arsenal of pain-relieving drugs includes strong opioid narcotics like morphine or oxycodone which have effectively relieved dental pain for decades. But although they work wonders, they're also highly addictive.

We've all been confronted in the last few years with startling headlines about the opioid addiction epidemic sweeping across the country. Annual deaths resulting from opioid addiction number in the tens of thousands, ahead of motor vehicle accident fatalities. Although illegal drugs like heroin account for some, the source for most addiction cases—an estimated 2 million in 2015 alone—is opioid prescriptions.

Dentists and other healthcare providers are seeking ways to address this problem. One way is to re-examine the use of opioids for pain management and to find alternative means that might reduce the number of narcotic prescriptions.

This has led to new approaches in dentistry regarding pain relief. In a trend that's been underway for several years, we've found managing post-discomfort for many procedures can be done effectively with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. They don't share the addictive quality of narcotics and are regarded as safer when taken as directed.

There's also been a recent modification with using NSAIDs. Dentists have found that alternating the use of ibuprofen and acetaminophen often amplifies the pain relief found using only one at a time. By doing so, we may further reduce the need for narcotics for more procedures.

The trend now in dentistry is to look first to NSAIDs to manage pain and discomfort after dental work. Narcotics may still be used, but only in a secondary role when absolutely needed. With less narcotic prescriptions thanks to these new pain management protocols, we can reduce the risk of a dangerous addiction.

If you would like more information on managing pain during and after dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Sood Family Dental
June 18, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: wisdom teeth  
WisdomTeethandWhattoDoAboutThem

As Spring turns to Summer, millions of students will depart high school in the time-honored rite of passage called graduation. At the same time, quite a few of these graduates will be experiencing another maturity milestone: the eruption (coming in) of their last permanent teeth.

Typically, these are the back third molars, better known as “wisdom teeth,” emerging on either end of both the top and bottom jaws sometime between the ages of 18 and 24. Their arrival heralds the end of a long development process that began in infancy.

But this auspicious event can give rise to dental problems. Because they’re the last to come in, wisdom teeth often erupt in an environment crowded by earlier teeth. Depending on jaw size and other factors, there may not be enough room for a normal eruption.

Wisdom teeth can thus erupt out of position, creating a poor bite (malocclusion). Or they might not erupt at all—becoming stuck fully or partially within the gums and bone, a condition known as impaction. Impacted teeth can also cause problems for the adjacent teeth, damaging the roots of the second molars or disrupting the surrounding gum tissue, making them more susceptible to periodontal (gum) disease.

Because of these and other issues, impacted wisdom teeth are among the most common type of teeth removed: an estimated 10 million each year. And many of these are removed before they show signs of disease or complications as a preemptive strike against developing dental problems.

Although unnecessary surgery should always be avoided, according to some research, there’s a one in three chance that erupting wisdom teeth that are not showing signs of trouble will eventually become problematic. And the earlier they’re removed, the lower the risk of post-extraction complications.

Wisdom teeth should always be evaluated on a case by case basis. Those with obvious signs of disease or complications do require prompt treatment, including possible extraction. Others that are asymptomatic can be monitored over time: If they’re tending to become problematic, we can adjust the treatment plan accordingly. Our goal is to ensure these particular teeth signaling the end of childhood won’t detract from dental health in adulthood, so a measured approach seems to be the best and safest one.

If you would like more information on treatment options for wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Wisdom Teeth: Coming of Age May Come With a Dilemma” and “Wisdom Teeth: To Be or Not to Be?


By Sood Family Dental
June 08, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
WhatYoucanDotoStopSugarfromHarmingYourHealth

Occurrences of obesity and Type 2 diabetes have soared in the last few decades. While there are a number of influencing factors, health officials place most of the blame on one of our favorite foods: sugar. Only a generation ago we were consuming an annual average of 4 pounds per person. Now, it's nearly 90 pounds.

We've long known that sugar, a favorite food not only for humans but also oral bacteria, contributes to dental disease. But we now have even more to concern us—the effect of increased sugar consumption on health in general.

It's time we took steps to rein in our favorite carbohydrate. Easier said than done, of course—not only is it hard to resist, it's also hard to avoid. With its steady addition over the years to more and more processed foods, nearly 77% of the products on grocery store shelves contain some form of sugar.

Here's what you can do, though, to reduce sugar in your diet and take better care of your dental and general health.

Be alert to added sugar in processed foods. To make wiser food choices, become familiar with the U.S.-mandated ingredient listing on food product packaging—it tells if any sugar has been added and how much. You should also become acquainted with sugar's many names like "sucrose" or "high fructose corn syrup," and marketing claims like "low fat" that may mean the producer has added sugar to improve taste.

Avoid sodas and other prepared beverages. Some of the highest sources for added sugar are sodas, sports drinks, teas or juice. You may be surprised to learn you could consume your recommended daily amount of sugar in one can of soda. Substitute sugary beverages with unsweetened drinks or water.

Exercise your body—and your voice. Physical activity, even the slightest amount, helps your body metabolize the sugar you consume. And speaking of activity, exercise your right to have your voice heard by your elected officials in support of policy changes toward less sugar additives in food products.

Becoming an informed buyer, disciplined consumer and proactive citizen are the most important ingredients for stopping this destructive health epidemic. Your teeth—and the rest of your body—will thank you.

If you would like more information on the effects of sugar on dental and general health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Bitter Truth About Sugar.”


By Sood Family Dental
June 04, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

The thought of having a root canal can be a bit intimidating for some people, however, this tooth-saving treatment can help you avoid moreroot canal invasive treatments such as extraction. Furthermore, the root canal procedure is similar to having a cavity filled, so there is nothing to fear! Here at Sood Family Dental in Shelby Township, MI, Dr. Sood provides this treatment for patients that have undergone dental trauma or have accumulated mass tooth decay—read on to learn if this treatment is right for you too!

What is a root canal?

A root canal is a procedure that preserves and restores infected teeth. At the center of each tooth is a soft material called dental pulp which runs through canals in the root. When this pulp becomes infected, root canal treatment is used to clean the infected areas inside the affected tooth.

This treatment is of utmost importance, for when the pulp is infected, teeth can become weak and damaged. Furthermore, the infection can cause an abscess to form below the tooth. If the infected pulp is not removed from inside the tooth and root, an extraction might be necessary. Additionally, the infection could spread to other teeth and place them at risk for extraction, as well.

When is a root canal needed?

There are several signs you might need a root canal. You might need one if you are experiencing sharp pain when biting into or chewing food. You might also need a root canal if you have a severe/persistent toothache or persistent pain or pressure in the mouth. Extreme sensitivity to hot or cold foods and beverages is another sign that you might need a root canal. Dr. Sood, your Shelby Township dentist, can examine any problem teeth to determine if they might benefit from root canal treatment.

How is a root canal performed?

The procedure for performing a root canal is quite similar to the procedure for filling a cavity. After prepping the tooth needing a root canal, the dentist will drill into the tooth to access the infected pulp, which will then be removed. Once all infected pulp is removed, the interior of the tooth and root is thoroughly cleaned. The tooth is then filled and sealed with dental filling just like a cavity. Afterward, the tooth will be stronger and will be able to resume normal biting and chewing functions without pain or sensitivity.

What are the benefits of a root canal?

A root canal offers several benefits, one of which being that it can preserve the natural tooth structure and avoid the need for extraction. Another benefit is that it protects other teeth from infection by stopping the infection from spreading. A root canal also alleviates any pain, pressure, or sensitivity caused by the infection. Finally, root canals restore weak and damaged teeth and make them strong again so they can resume normal tooth functions.

Give us a call!

To find out if your tooth can be saved with root canal treatment, schedule an appointment with Dr. Sood by calling Sood Family Dental in Shelby Township, MI, at (586) 207-1471!




Dentist in Shelby Township, MI
Sood Family Dental
56732 Van Dyke Avenue
Shelby Township, MI 48316

(586) 207-1471
[email protected]

HOURS
Monday: 11:00am - 7:00pm
Tuesday: 11:00am - 7:00pm
Wednesday: By appointment
Thursday: 9:00am - 5:00pm
Friday: By appointment
Saturday: 8:00am - 2:00pm
Sunday: Closed

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